5

Can "false premise" ever be used as a reason to close a question? I know it can inspire comments which ask the questioner to provide sources, but if the evidence shows that the underlying presumption in the question is wrong, can that drive a valid "vote to close"?

Inspired by this question -- not only does the asked point not provide any sources, but sources are provided which indicate that the premise of the question is not correct. The current choices don't clearly have that as a category for closure AFAICT.

I am sure that for some questions, this option might be used prematurely, before the question provides its own source or the responses are shown not to be on point, but at least then the questioner could rework the question and it can be nominated for re-opening.

  • 3
    Just some food for thought, not really an answer to this question (yet): Maybe it depends on how clearly false the premise is and/or on how crucial to the question the false premise is. – msh210 Aug 2 '16 at 16:55
  • 7
    Usually a false premise is best corrected in an answer. An obviously false premise certainly deserves down votes as the question is then very poorly motivated. – Double AA Aug 2 '16 at 17:10
  • 1
    If any standard close reason would apply, I think it would be "unclear what you are asking" – Double AA Aug 2 '16 at 17:51
  • @DoubleAA in the linked question, the "what" is discernable, but I just wish I could push a button and have it say "What's your hava amina for asking?" – rosends Aug 2 '16 at 18:36
  • About sometimes similar types of questions: meta.judaism.stackexchange.com/q/1975 and meta.judaism.stackexchange.com/q/3540 – msh210 Aug 2 '16 at 22:27
  • @DoubleAA I think your comments could constitute an answer. – Isaac Moses Aug 3 '16 at 14:35
  • There's a "Some of the information contained in this post requires additional references. Please edit to add citations to reliable sources that support the assertions made here. Unsourced material may be disputed or deleted." post notice we could use. I don't think we should, personally, or at least not if it's worded like that, but maybe some will differ. – msh210 Aug 5 '16 at 21:15
4

I think the FAQs do a fine job of defining things as off-topic. I see no reason to add this new reason. Furthermore, it would be inconvenient to have a question that you can only know is off-topic once you know the answer, or at least part of it.

As @doubleAA noted: Usually a false premise is best corrected in an answer. An obviously false premise certainly deserves down votes as the question is then very poorly motivated.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .