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A question Mekoros book for עוז והדר לבושה asking to find a sefer online described a sefer by a well-known posek as an “infamous work”.

Not satisfied with that, someone posted a derogatory comment אל תקרי לבושה של תורה אלא ל"בושה" של תורה... which attracted 4 upvotes.

Are there any guidelines on this site for treating Poskim with respect (even when participants disagree with their pesokim)?

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    It probably is objectively the best and most well known example, at least outside the Charedi world, of a book by an Orthodox rabbi that is so universally rejected as innovative extreme stringency based in illogical cherry-picked polemic. So I'm not sure infamous is an inaccurate descriptor. He didn't say "stupid" or something disrespectful. Perhaps "infamous, at least outside the Charedi world, work" would be more accurate. "Highly controversial work" or "widely criticized work" would probably be simpler and less likely to offend others. – Double AA Nov 21 '18 at 20:04
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    Similar judaism.meta.stackexchange.com/q/4311/759 – Double AA Nov 21 '18 at 20:14
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    @DoubleAA duplicate? – Isaac Moses Nov 21 '18 at 20:22
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    I heard a saying somewhere that fits here. When you are about to say something, ask yourself three things: is it true? is it necessary? is it kind? You must answer yes at least twice to proceed. This sounds like something that is neither kind nor necessary (I have no opinion on its truth). – Monica Cellio Nov 21 '18 at 20:22
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    Consider also the climate this sort of commentary can create -- even when not directed at Yodeyans, it sets a tone. – Monica Cellio Nov 21 '18 at 20:27
  • "so universally rejected as innovative extreme stringency based in illogical cherry-picked polemic" is probably worse than "infamous" - why is no one offended by that? – רבות מחשבות Nov 21 '18 at 20:45
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    Probably because it's clinical not gratuitous @רבות – Double AA Nov 21 '18 at 20:56
  • @DoubleAA, fair. – רבות מחשבות Nov 21 '18 at 21:27
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I deleted the comment described here. No matter who the target is (except maybe things like Avoda Zara), serious critique is valuable, while snarky insults are the opposite.

I also left a comment asking the author to substitute "infamous," which by itself is needlessly inflammatory, with a description that's more defensible and clear.

Let's disagree without being disagreeable.

Regarding the broader question of site policy on etiquette when disagreeing with rabbis, I believe that was addressed well in the answers to this previous Meta post:

Is criticism of the views of great Rabbis appropriate to the site?

  • what's the "maybe" about? – Loewian Nov 22 '18 at 1:11
  • In a now-deleted comment, the OP agreed with your edit. – Monica Cellio Nov 22 '18 at 1:59

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