8

Currently the site uses 'flags' to mark a comment as unconstructive (a word not recognized by the Merriam-Webster dictionary or our site's spell check by the way), offensive, or spam. However in Yiddishkeit a flag is generally seen as a positive thing. In fact the word used for a flag is 'Nes' which also means a miraculous intervention by God.

This may confuse users who will believe that 'flagging' a comment is an indication that it is somehow miraculous. As such, perhaps we should change the system.


This question is Purim Torah and is not intended to be taken completely seriously. See the Purim Torah policy.

closed as too localized by msh210 Feb 28 '13 at 18:34

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 9
    Also, note, all questions tagged with 'bugs' should be properly checked – none Feb 29 '12 at 2:41
  • 4
    All questions should be checked for bugs, whether they're immediately apparent or not. Perhaps we could use something like this to aid in the checking. – Isaac Moses Feb 29 '12 at 2:46
  • 3
    is it flagging or flogging? – Shmuel Brin Feb 29 '12 at 4:29
11

Yoma 68b tells us that they used to wave flags as a signal that the scapegoat (of Yom Kippur) had reached the desert and was on its way to its death, carrying all of the sins of the Jewish people on it.

Here, too, then, the flags signify a post that has transgressed the rules and must be terminated with extreme prejudice (though maybe not to the extent of throwing it off a cliff).

  • 2
    I disagree. ......... We should definitely throw 'em off a cliff. – HodofHod Feb 11 '13 at 5:12

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .