15

That's a good question, but it's been asked already here on Mi Yodeya Meta. Now, suppose this answer I'm penning is unclear to you or incomplete. Wouldn't it be better for me to write it as an answer to the older question instead, where you can read preexisting answers also, and to link you there? And wouldn't it be better for future readers to read all the ...


11

I don't think there is anything wrong with such a question, provided that it meets the general standards of Mi Yodeya questions. That means, among other things, that it is on topic (it is a question about Judaism), it is reasonably answerable, it can be answered factually (e.g. by citing sources) rather than by opinions, it is not too broad or too limited, ...


9

I think part of the problem lies in this post itself. Notice how Double AA gave what should have been an answer in the comment section. I think that some of us are afraid or lazy to give an official answer, and just quickly shoot off an answer and move on. We need more incentive to actually write our answers in the answer box, in a proper fashion.


8

Welcome to Mi.Yodeya, a Question and Answer site for people who base their lives on Jewish law and tradition. Like any Q&A site, improving the quality of your question will almost always improve the quality of the answer you receive. Here is an example: If witchcraft has no power when the practitioner is not connected to the ground, how could Bilaam ...


8

I can't speak for others, but when I leave such comments I'm seeking clarification, not challenging the question. If somebody says "I've heard" or "I've seen", I naturally ask "where?" -- not as a challenge but, rather, because if you tell us where you've encountered the teaching/practice/idea, it can help prospective answer-ers to investigate. We want to ...


7

I think the question you should ask yourself, when writing a post that necessarily involves some jargon or other obscure language, is: will everybody who is likely to be interested in this topic be able to understand it? This means the threshold is in different places for different kinds of questions: A question about the basics of kashrut, prayer, or ...


7

I like practice.


7

This option was implemented on Feb. 24, 2017. Low-key alternative: Instead of making a rate-limiting rule, just include a gentle reminder to not post junk, and then remind any users who post many low-quality posts to try to adjust their quality/quantity balance. The reminder could go at the bottom of the "What" section of the policy, and could take the ...


7

If a question asks whether there's Judaism significance to an observed phenomenon, and if it provides some motivation for why we might expect there to be Judaism significance to that phenomenon, then it's about Judaism, regardless of whether the phenomenon is linguistic, natural, or Halachic, and it's on-topic. Does that mean that there are many questions ...


6

I think there are two aspects to bringing in questions from elsewhere: impact on the source, and impact on the community. Impact on the source Stack Exchange welcomes questions from anywhere, and in a blog post I can't find now, Jeff Atwood or Joel Spolsky (IIRC) explicitly suggested the following strategy for promoting SE sites: find a question "in the ...


6

Some questions looking for sources (you linked to one in your question, and that user has had several similar questions) clearly start with a source, but they are hiding the ball. It is too specific to be otherwise (how did they know that elephants are only required for the north west, but north east allows for horses?). Essentially they saw something ...


6

I think such questions are likely to be Too Broad unless they include very well-defined criteria for filtering or sorting answers. Without those, there are literally infinite distinct, equally-valid answers to each question. Given the way you've laid out the goals of the project, I don't think well-defined criteria will be consistent with them. More ...


6

Our "Site policy on jargon" says: When writing questions and answers on Mi Yodeya, the overall guiding principle you should have in mind is: Will any English speaker who is interested in this content be able to understand what it means without additional research? ... Don't use non-English terms gratuitously. If there's an English term ...


6

Just to close the loop: this has been resolved.


6

Usually it's best to ask questions separately (it's fine; there's no quota :-) ), but I'll go ahead and answer these together since they're short. Is there a chat room for this site? There sure is! Our main chat room is V'dibarta Bam, which you can reach from anywhere on the site by clicking on the blue Stack Exchange logo in the top left corner and ...


6

The FAQ, elaborated here, says "questions about Jewish practice" are in-scope. I believe that means that the question must relate to the Jewish aspects of a practice, real or imagined. There are certainly non-deleted questions having to do with extremely specific and infrequent scenarios already on the site (example). Elsewhere on meta, the guiding ...


6

The Stack Exchange engine automatically orders the tags by popularity when a question is posted or edited, no matter what the author or editors do. It must be, in your example, that food and blessing took turns having more questions than each other over the years.


6

Wow. With that record, I would be unpleasantly surprised to get this message, too. It's important to note that this message was triggered by an automatic process, not by a person. So, it's not that someone's coming after you on the Fast of Av. Also, apparently, there's a significant margin between this message and an actual question ban. Here is the big, ...


6

If what you really want is that same question answered, but not with that answer, then yes, a new question post would likely be a duplicate of the first one Here are some things you can do to try to get more, better answers. Only the first three have any reputation-score restriction associated with them. Add a bounty. Comment on the answer you don't like, ...


6

As I wrote in my answer to If I know the answer to a question..............: Consequently, I think it's important to make sure to write all questions from the point of view of someone who doesn't know an answer, and accordingly, include as much information as possible to help answerers. In particular, if your Q&A is motivated by the fact that you were ...


5

In the situation you describe, in which you came up with the question yourself and only afterward found it elsewhere, I think the most reasonable course of action is to write up your own version of the question irrespective of what someone else wrote elsewhere. If you wish to link to the other question from yours (or from a comment on yours) as an ...


5

I like this limitation. I think a reasonable cap would be one question per day per user, without roll-over questions. This would both cause users to weigh their PTIJ posts for selection of their best material, and create some built-in spreading of PTIJ posts over the season, so that they aren't all flooded in at once. PTIJ season lasts about 16 days, so ...


4

In hypothetical #1, we have in the past sometimes closed the earlier, worse-asked question, if it was objectively badly asked. (By "objectively" I mean only "even without comparing it to the newer question".) I think that's a reasonable thing to do. Just my opinion. I'm posting answers to your various hypotheticals separately so people can vote on them ...


4

As previous answers have indicated, there's no reason you can't post a question and specify very clearly that you are only interested in answers that come from [particular types of] sources. I would add that, as previous answers seem to have taken your proposed question to be about rabbinic analysis of evolution itself, rather than of the ethical quandary ...


4

Sounds like a good question to me. I suggest you emphasize in the question that you're looking only for what rabbinic authorities have written on the matter and not for seeming proofs according to the answerer's view. Something similar has been done before — though those questions restricted answers to those that cite sources and you can go a step ...


4

Feel free to copy the following boilerplate comment: Welcome to [judaism.SE] and thanks for your question! Like any Q&A site, improving the quality of your question will almost always improve the quality of the answer you receive. You can really improve on this question if you could XYZ. (See http://meta.judaism.stackexchange.com/a/1715 for some more ...


4

Sometimes what's Googlable for one person isn't for another: the person doesn't know what to search for. Sometimes the answer is Googlable, but there is misinformation on the 'Net (or the asker may think there is) and the asker doesn't know what's Judaism-sourced and what's not. Those are both sufficient reasons to ask on-site, I think. If the question ...


4

Though I still think that the implementation of a limit on PTIJ questions is unnecessary per my other answer to this question it seems that my position is not the majority based on how voting has gone so far on this question. The currently top-voted answer proposes a minimum waiting time between posts. If we do go this route, I'd like to propose suspending ...


4

While allowing posts in any language would be problematic for our site (as discussed here that we need a user base "capable of answering, evaluating, voting on, improving, maintaining, categorizing, moderating behavior, etc."), it seems to me that as a byproduct of attracting a community of experts in Judaism we have also attracted a significant community of ...


4

I would think that if the figure is indicative of Judaism itself, it would be on topic and otherwise off-topic. For example, the question of what Rabbi Akiva or Rav Saadya Gaon held about free will, is on topic, and Judaism; not Jews. So to, a question about their position on a halakhic matter would be on topic. A question about what Sigmund Freud or Milo ...


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