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TZT / Time zone tov / Good time zone - Have a good one. "TZT" is an initialization of "time zone tov." "Time zone tov" is a partial Hebraization of "good time zone," adopting the form of the common Hebrew greeting "Shavua' tov" ("Have a good week.") "Good time zone" is meant to be an equivalent of "Good day" or "Good night," to be used when the speaker is ...


11

yodeyan - A member of the Mi Yodeya community. Generated by affixing the suffix "-an" to the word "Yodeya," from the community's name. Earliest known usage: Isaac Moses, in a January 18, 2010 post on the "lo.yodeya" blog that he wrote during the early days of mi.yodeya 1.0 said, fruitlessly (except for the coinage): I'd be very interested to hear your ...


9

Rfפ - Request for פְּסַק (pesak / rabbinic ruling) Presumably pronounced, if at all, "arr eff pay." This is shorthand for a characteristic of a question that could cause it to be closed on Mi Yodeya - requesting a practical ruling, as if from a rabbi. Earliest known usage: Scimonster, in an edit summary, November 24, 2014. Earlier, inferior version, RfP, ...


8

Bam -- our main general site-related chatroom, V'dibarta Bam. Earliest known comparison of the word בם to the English onomatopoeia BAM: msh210 in Bam on 2012 May 23 15:41 Earliest known usage as a stand alone name: Adam Mosheh in Bam on 2012 Jun 13 14:24 Earliest known Hebrew usage: Double AA in Bam on 2012 Jun 15 22:50


7

I suggest that you go ahead and start a community-wikified list of requested additions to the Glossary, either as a re-write of this question post, as an answer to it, or as a new question post. Then, ask Glossary editors to delete or strike-out entries on your list as they add them to the Glossary.


5

O-Cmon (also O-כמאן) - A fictitious kosher-certification agency with notoriously low standards. This hechsher was first mentioned on a PTIJ question from 2012 asking what a particular strange marking was on some foods. The answer describes it as "the world’s first crowd-sourced Kosher certification." This agency is occasionally mentioned on Mi Yodeya (e.g. ...


5

PTIJ / p-t-i-j - Purim Torah - in jest This term is the initialization of the purim-torah-in-jest tag, which is applied, in accordance with the Purim Torah policy, to in-season non-serious questions. Earliest known usage: May 8, 2013 by Isaac Moses, in Bam: @msh210 File away for PTIJ 5774: this pun, along with conspiracy theories


5

JeLLy - of or related to Jewish Life and Learning It derives from when the site was defined as not Judaism, but Jewish Life & Learning. Basically, if something is JeLLy, then it is on-topic for this site, and if it's not, then it is not. Earliest known usage: Feb 6, 2013 by @msh210 in Bam: Isaac Moses: @msh210 Can you [edit] in a JL&L-relevant ...


4

This image is an excerpt from a screenshot of the Badges sidebar on the front page of the Judaism Stack Exchange beta website1, indicating that user Shalom was awarded the bronze badge for answering questions in the shabbat tag. Because it shows the words "shabbat Shalom," it's used in Chat as a humorous way for people to wish each other Shabbat Shalom. ...


4

ראשון Rishon singular - noun ראשונים Rishonim plural - Literally "the first ones"; leading Rabbis and Poskim who lived approximately from the 11th to the 15th centuries


3

ממה נפשך -- m'mah nafshach, mimah nafshach -- prepositional phrase - literally whatever you think Used to introduce a disjunction elimination, namely, that no matter which option you choose from a set of options, conclusion X (or question X) follows. Example: If you're Jewish, you believe in God, ממה נפשך. If you're a Chassid, you believe because you ...


2

ברכת המזון — Birkat Hamazon, Bentching, Benching — noun — A specific prayer said after a bread-based meal. The text varies slightly by community tradition. More at Wikipedia. See also bentching.


2

מחבר — mechaber, m'chaber, mehaber — noun composer, author ("the mechaber") specifically, the author of Shulchan Aruch


2

ספק – safek – adjective – a doubt or uncertainty. contrasts with וודאי – vaday – adjective – certain "There was a safek if the meat was from the Kosher store or not." ספק ספיקא– sefeik sefeika – noun – a double doubt A principle in Halacha whereby even in certain cases where one must be strict in a doubtful situation one may be lenient if there are two ...


2

הלכה למעשה - halacha l'ma'aseh - practical halacha


2

תורה — Torah The Pentateuch: the first five books of the Bible (Genesis through Deuteronomy). That word appears six times in the Torah. (nonstandard) A copy of the Pentateuch, especially a scroll written according to certain rules, of the sort read from in synagogues. (More accurate: Sefer Torah [Torah scroll]) He removed two Torahs from the ark. That ...


2

‏(תַּלְמוּד) יְרוּשָׁלְמִי — (Talmud) Yerushalmi — the Jerusalem Talmud


2

חז"ל — Hazal, Chazal [lit. acronym for חכמינו זכרם לברכה; our sages of blessed memory] — Used to refer collectively to the sages of the Talmud. Oftentimes referred to by default as 'the Sages'. May be used as an adjective: Hazalic/Chazalic, to describe such works. See also Wikipedia.


2

Can someone please add "סגולה" to the glossary? It's used many times on Mi Yodeya. (I'd do it myself, but I don't rightly know what it means. (Though this helps a little.))


2

תשובה — teshuvah, t'shuva — noun — literally, a return a reply letter to a question, especially one of Jewish law or practiceRabbi Schwartz spends a lot of time on each teshuvah, making sure it's correct, before he mails it. (in the plural, as part of a title) such letters, published as a bookHe's reading T'shuvos Maharamash. (singular only) repentance, ...


1

באַשערט — bashert — (originally, adjective) preordained, destined (thus, noun) soulmate, preordained spouse This is from the Yiddish adjective, and you sometimes see it declined for case, gender, and number as in Yiddish: basherte, basherter, bashertn.


1

חילול השם - Chillul Hashem Desecration of Hashem's name. For more detail see Wikipedia.


1

נושאי כלים - nos'ei keilim Literally "armiger" or "arms-bearer," this word is commonly used to refer to commentaries on an earlier work (especially in halacha). For example, Mishna Berura is among the most commonly used נושאי כלים on the Orach Chayim section of Shulchan Aruch. (source)


1

מִצְוָה — Mitzvah — singular noun — commandment, command; specifically, a religious command of God's or any of a particular class of rabbinic edicts classified as "mitzvah of the rabbis" mitzvos, mitzvot — plural


1

חס ושלום — chas v'shalom — roughly, Heaven forfend, God forbid (See also more information on its etymology / literal meaning and what it's used for.) ח״ו — ch"v — abbreviation.


1

שבע מצוות בני נח‎ Sheva mitzvot B'nei Noach -- The Seven Laws of Noah (also known as the Noahide or Noachide laws) that apply to non-Jewish people. Do not worship idols or any deity other than God. Do not blaspheme God. Do not murder. Do not engage in sexual immorality Do not steal. Do not eat of a live animal. Establish courts/legal system to ensure law ...


1

מחלל שבת -- M'Chalel Shabbat, Mchallel Shabbat, Mchalel Shabbos - [One who] desecrates the Sabbath. חילול שבת -- Chillul Shabbat, Chilul Shabbos - Desecration of the Sabbath.


1

בפרהסיא Bfarhesia, B'farhesia - Publically, In Public


1

מיקל – meikel – verb – to be lenient, as in matters of law. contrasts with מחמיר – machmir – verb – to be stringent or strict, as in matters of law. Rabbi Schwartz is meikil on the issue, while Rabbi Weiss is machmir. Actually masculine singular present-tense verbs (or present participles), these are often used in English preceded by copulas, as in the ...


1

כביכול — kivyachol, kaveyachol — literally as with one who is able — used when saying something about God that does not apply to Him


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