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The community has generally accepted the following jargon guidelines.1 They're not hard-and-fast rules, but should be considered by users when posting and when editing others' posts. When writing questions and answers on Mi Yodeya, the overall guiding principle you should have in mind is: Will any English speaker who is interested in this content be able ...


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If you can tell what the author is trying to say, please edit the post to fix it if you can. (Leaving a comment saying you did so and asking for confirmation, particularly if the poster is new to the site, is helpful.) If you can't tell what the author is trying to say and no one else has already done so, you can leave a comment asking for clarification. ...


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No; we should not. We have built a community of experts who are fluent in English, who are capable of answering, evaluating, voting on, improving, maintaining, categorizing, moderating behavior around, etc. content in English. We have not built a community that assumes fluency in any other language of discourse. To build such a community effectively would ...


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It's not offensive to use the proper names commonly used in English. It's fine. The language of discourse on Mi Yodeya is English, which presents an inherent challenge when dealing with terms, including proper names, that are originally Hebrew. The most common practice here is generally to use one's favorite scheme of phonetic transliteration, which ...


9

It's not offensive to use variant names, no. (Except "old testament" -- that one's offensive to a lot of people.) There are currently 989 posts containing "Moses" and 460 containing "Deuteronomy", so it's not even uncommon. You'll likely get answers that use the Hebrew forms of names, but it shouldn't be difficult for you to interpret them. If somebody ...


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My understanding of the Jargon policy is that the answers are to the level of the question. Complex "insider-baseball" questions get quite tedious to answer in the Queen's English. But if the level of the question is one coming from someone who just isn't up to the technical terms, I try my best to translate everything, communicate using English idioms and ...


7

I like practice.


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I think the question you should ask yourself, when writing a post that necessarily involves some jargon or other obscure language, is: will everybody who is likely to be interested in this topic be able to understand it? This means the threshold is in different places for different kinds of questions: A question about the basics of kashrut, prayer, or ...


6

One small step we've taken in this direction (heh) is offering an integrated virtual keyboard which includes a convenient ‏ key. (You can thank HodofHod for the idea.) As I mentioned on the network-wide request, we don't have any immediate plans to go further. However, internationalization is an important part of our strategy. Please give us ...


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Our "Site policy on jargon" says: When writing questions and answers on Mi Yodeya, the overall guiding principle you should have in mind is: Will any English speaker who is interested in this content be able to understand what it means without additional research? ... Don't use non-English terms gratuitously. If there's an English term ...


6

In my experience those names are used quite often around here without complaint. If they work for you, go right ahead. It might even be preferred to use them if they aren't that obscure, based on our Jargon Policy. Just be careful with some terms that carry strong Christian-specific meaning like "Old/New Testament".


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I am sorry you have had this experience, and I hope we will all take your thoughtful question as a reminder that we serve a large and varied community. When I see terms I don't know in posts (especially yeshivish, which seems to run to entire sentences of incomprehensibility in my experience), I leave a comment asking for clarification and this almost ...


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There's a difference between "lack of knowledge" and "lack of research". If you look at question downvote button on ALL SE sites (not just this one) it lists "lack of research" as on of the primary reasons to downvote a question. As such, a question that is so trivial as to be found by basic Google search for obvious terms is worthy of downvotes ("is eating ...


5

I always thought that biblical Hebrew was on topic. You know, if you have a question about what a word means in a certain Pasuk. I'm pretty sure such questions are left open all the time. Talmudic Hebrew and Aramaic as well.


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ראשון Rishon singular - noun ראשונים Rishonim plural - Literally "the first ones"; leading Rabbis and Poskim who lived approximately from the 11th to the 15th centuries


3

ממה נפשך -- m'mah nafshach, mimah nafshach -- prepositional phrase - literally whatever you think Used to introduce a disjunction elimination, namely, that no matter which option you choose from a set of options, conclusion X (or question X) follows. Example: If you're Jewish, you believe in God, ממה נפשך. If you're a Chassid, you believe because you ...


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This is something that we definitely want to support, but we want to do it properly in conjunction with the other localization work that is currently going into the engine. It is possible for us to turn on tweaks to Markdown that allows for these special blocks, but they can (and do) quickly turn into much bigger endeavors than we imagined as we deal with ...


2

Instead of literally typing &rlm, It is also possible -- and some people would also say easier -- to: use a word processor such as Microsoft Word, OpenOffice, or LibreOffice to edit your text, and to graphically insert the right-to-left character using the appropriate menu item copy and paste the resulting text into your browser, where you are composing/...


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ברכת המזון — Birkat Hamazon, Bentching, Benching — noun — A specific prayer said after a bread-based meal. The text varies slightly by community tradition. More at Wikipedia. See also bentching.


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מחבר — mechaber, m'chaber, mehaber — noun composer, author ("the mechaber") specifically, the author of Shulchan Aruch


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ספר — sefer, seifer — noun a Jewish-content or holy book a book Plural: ספרים — sforim, sefarim, s'farim


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פוסק — posek — noun someone who issues decisions of halacha (Jewish law) plural: פוסקים — poskim, posekim See also the question "Posek vs. Rabbi?" and the tag posek-psak-decisor-ruling.


2

חייב or חיב — chayav — adj. obligated (to do something)Someone who forgot to say the "Yaale V'yavo" part of the prayer is chayav to repeat the whole prayer. liable, owing (money or the like)If he stole $100, he's chayav $200. due (a punishment)Someone who worships another god is chayav death by stoning. plural: חייבים — chayavim synonym: מחויב or מחוייב — ...


2

מלרע milra' and מלעיל mil'eil — preposition phrases (used as adjectives or adverbs) — when pronouncing Hebrew, where the stress is placed. Milra' stress is on the final syllable (e.g. sha-BAT, hav-da-LA); mil'eil stress is on the penultimate syllable (e.g. sha-MA-yim, ME-lech).


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ספק – safek – adjective – a doubt or uncertainty. contrasts with וודאי – vaday – adjective – certain "There was a safek if the meat was from the Kosher store or not." ספק ספיקא– sefeik sefeika – noun – a double doubt A principle in Halacha whereby even in certain cases where one must be strict in a doubtful situation one may be lenient if there are two ...


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הלכה למעשה - halacha l'ma'aseh - practical halacha


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תורה — Torah The Pentateuch: the first five books of the Bible (Genesis through Deuteronomy). That word appears six times in the Torah. (nonstandard) A copy of the Pentateuch, especially a scroll written according to certain rules, of the sort read from in synagogues. (More accurate: Sefer Torah [Torah scroll]) He removed two Torahs from the ark. That ...


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‏(תַּלְמוּד) יְרוּשָׁלְמִי — (Talmud) Yerushalmi — the Jerusalem Talmud


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חז"ל — Hazal, Chazal [lit. acronym for חכמינו זכרם לברכה; our sages of blessed memory] — Used to refer collectively to the sages of the Talmud. Oftentimes referred to by default as 'the Sages'. May be used as an adjective: Hazalic/Chazalic, to describe such works. See also Wikipedia.


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תשובה — teshuvah, t'shuva — noun — literally, a return a reply letter to a question, especially one of Jewish law or practiceRabbi Schwartz spends a lot of time on each teshuvah, making sure it's correct, before he mails it. (in the plural, as part of a title) such letters, published as a bookHe's reading T'shuvos Maharamash. (singular only) repentance, ...


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