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No; we should not. We have built a community of experts who are fluent in English, who are capable of answering, evaluating, voting on, improving, maintaining, categorizing, moderating behavior around, etc. content in English. We have not built a community that assumes fluency in any other language of discourse. To build such a community effectively would ...


10

It's not offensive to use the proper names commonly used in English. It's fine. The language of discourse on Mi Yodeya is English, which presents an inherent challenge when dealing with terms, including proper names, that are originally Hebrew. The most common practice here is generally to use one's favorite scheme of phonetic transliteration, which ...


9

It's not offensive to use variant names, no. (Except "old testament" -- that one's offensive to a lot of people.) There are currently 989 posts containing "Moses" and 460 containing "Deuteronomy", so it's not even uncommon. You'll likely get answers that use the Hebrew forms of names, but it shouldn't be difficult for you to interpret them. If somebody ...


8

My understanding of the Jargon policy is that the answers are to the level of the question. Complex "insider-baseball" questions get quite tedious to answer in the Queen's English. But if the level of the question is one coming from someone who just isn't up to the technical terms, I try my best to translate everything, communicate using English idioms and ...


7

I like practice.


7

I think the question you should ask yourself, when writing a post that necessarily involves some jargon or other obscure language, is: will everybody who is likely to be interested in this topic be able to understand it? This means the threshold is in different places for different kinds of questions: A question about the basics of kashrut, prayer, or ...


6

In my experience those names are used quite often around here without complaint. If they work for you, go right ahead. It might even be preferred to use them if they aren't that obscure, based on our Jargon Policy. Just be careful with some terms that carry strong Christian-specific meaning like "Old/New Testament".


6

Our "Site policy on jargon" says: When writing questions and answers on Mi Yodeya, the overall guiding principle you should have in mind is: Will any English speaker who is interested in this content be able to understand what it means without additional research? ... Don't use non-English terms gratuitously. If there's an English term ...


6

One small step we've taken in this direction (heh) is offering an integrated virtual keyboard which includes a convenient ‏ key. (You can thank HodofHod for the idea.) As I mentioned on the network-wide request, we don't have any immediate plans to go further. However, internationalization is an important part of our strategy. Please give us ...


5

I always thought that biblical Hebrew was on topic. You know, if you have a question about what a word means in a certain Pasuk. I'm pretty sure such questions are left open all the time. Talmudic Hebrew and Aramaic as well.


5

There's a difference between "lack of knowledge" and "lack of research". If you look at question downvote button on ALL SE sites (not just this one) it lists "lack of research" as on of the primary reasons to downvote a question. As such, a question that is so trivial as to be found by basic Google search for obvious terms is worthy of downvotes ("is eating ...


4

ראשון Rishon singular - noun ראשונים Rishonim plural - Literally "the first ones"; leading Rabbis and Poskim who lived approximately from the 11th to the 15th centuries


3

ממה נפשך -- m'mah nafshach, mimah nafshach -- prepositional phrase - literally whatever you think Used to introduce a disjunction elimination, namely, that no matter which option you choose from a set of options, conclusion X (or question X) follows. Example: If you're Jewish, you believe in God, ממה נפשך. If you're a Chassid, you believe because you ...


2

ספק – safek – adjective – a doubt or uncertainty. contrasts with וודאי – vaday – adjective – certain "There was a safek if the meat was from the Kosher store or not." ספק ספיקא– sefeik sefeika – noun – a double doubt A principle in Halacha whereby even in certain cases where one must be strict in a doubtful situation one may be lenient if there are two ...


2

‏(תַּלְמוּד) יְרוּשָׁלְמִי — (Talmud) Yerushalmi — the Jerusalem Talmud


2

הלכה למעשה - halacha l'ma'aseh - practical halacha


2

תורה — Torah The Pentateuch: the first five books of the Bible (Genesis through Deuteronomy). That word appears six times in the Torah. (nonstandard) A copy of the Pentateuch, especially a scroll written according to certain rules, of the sort read from in synagogues. (More accurate: Sefer Torah [Torah scroll]) He removed two Torahs from the ark. That ...


2

תשובה — teshuvah, t'shuva — noun — literally, a return a reply letter to a question, especially one of Jewish law or practiceRabbi Schwartz spends a lot of time on each teshuvah, making sure it's correct, before he mails it. (in the plural, as part of a title) such letters, published as a bookHe's reading T'shuvos Maharamash. (singular only) repentance, ...


2

I think that just asking nicely does the trick. As you did most recently to this question. i usually do take the time out to translate and use jargon which is "shaveh lechol nefesh" - common to all, but sometimes its just too difficult. But because you prodded me nicely, I took the time out to do so. Maybe in the question add in italics and bold in the ...


2

Mi Yodeya, as with the rest of StackExchange, strives to be two things: a community of experts, asking high level questions, and also a place for beginners to get information. If you're asking or answering a beginner level question, or at least a question that a beginner would find interesting if they could understand it, it's important to dejargonify. ...


2

חז"ל — Hazal, Chazal [lit. acronym for חכמינו זכרם לברכה; our sages of blessed memory] — Used to refer collectively to the sages of the Talmud. Oftentimes referred to by default as 'the Sages'. May be used as an adjective: Hazalic/Chazalic, to describe such works. See also Wikipedia.


1

Perhaps we should encourage downvoting answers that don't translate jargon with a comment saying we are downvoting for that reason, and then once the jargon has been translated, we remove our downvotes? We would have to do this even in cases where the OP doesn't ask for jargon assistance, because we want to encourage everyone to translate at all times, ...


1

חילול השם - Chillul Hashem Desecration of Hashem's name. For more detail see Wikipedia.


1

נושאי כלים - nos'ei keilim Literally "armiger" or "arms-bearer," this word is commonly used to refer to commentaries on an earlier work (especially in halacha). For example, Mishna Berura is among the most commonly used נושאי כלים on the Orach Chayim section of Shulchan Aruch. (source)


1

באַשערט — bashert — (originally, adjective) preordained, destined (thus, noun) soulmate, preordained spouse This is from the Yiddish adjective, and you sometimes see it declined for case, gender, and number as in Yiddish: basherte, basherter, bashertn.


1

חס ושלום — chas v'shalom — roughly, Heaven forfend, God forbid (See also more information on its etymology / literal meaning and what it's used for.) ח״ו — ch"v — abbreviation.


1

שבע מצוות בני נח‎ Sheva mitzvot B'nei Noach -- The Seven Laws of Noah (also known as the Noahide or Noachide laws) that apply to non-Jewish people. Do not worship idols or any deity other than God. Do not blaspheme God. Do not murder. Do not engage in sexual immorality Do not steal. Do not eat of a live animal. Establish courts/legal system to ensure law ...


1

מִצְוָה — Mitzvah — singular noun — commandment, command; specifically, a religious command of God's or any of a particular class of rabbinic edicts classified as "mitzvah of the rabbis" mitzvos, mitzvot — plural


1

מחלל שבת -- M'Chalel Shabbat, Mchallel Shabbat, Mchalel Shabbos - [One who] desecrates the Sabbath. חילול שבת -- Chillul Shabbat, Chilul Shabbos - Desecration of the Sabbath.


1

בפרהסיא Bfarhesia, B'farhesia - Publically, In Public


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