11

This was implemented in 5778. I move to change All Purim Torah questions must include the following disclaimer code at the bottom: --- #This question is [Purim Torah](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Purim_Torah) and is not intended to be taken completely seriously. See the [Purim Torah policy](http://meta.judaism.stackexchange.com/questions/797/).# to ...


10



9

status-completed Ok we're implementing this. Please do this for all new questions. (Don't bump an old question just for this, but if you are bumping it anyway then go ahead and do this too.) I suggested this at https://judaism.meta.stackexchange.com/a/3838/759 It is currently voted +10/-3. I still strongly support it. How does it hurt to be more clear?


9

I don't think we should revisit the tagging policy. Firstly, we should keep things uniform as much as possible. Secondly, if I'm searching for a tag, I don't want to have dozens of results that I cannot answer, and provide no useful information on the topic. Thirdly, adding tags will allow users to get score for those tags, which to me is a bit misleading ...


9

The PTIJ questions are supposed to be in jest, yes, but that doesn't mean they're exempt from all the other requirements of a Mi Yodeya question. Thus, they should include enough background info for people to understand the question; should be real, answerable questions; and should exemplify d'racheha darche noam. In addition, they should follow the PTIJ ...


8

Note: I think that if we want to ensure that all relevant users will read and apply the entire policy, we need to make it more inviting and readable than the incumbent version, especially if we're increasing the complexity of the rules. This is one attempt at that. I'd love to see other rewrites that demonstrate other ways to communicate this policy ...


7

This option was implemented on Feb. 24, 2017. Low-key alternative: Instead of making a rate-limiting rule, just include a gentle reminder to not post junk, and then remind any users who post many low-quality posts to try to adjust their quality/quantity balance. The reminder could go at the bottom of the "What" section of the policy, and could take the ...


7

The interpretation of the Gemara there (6b) is that according to Rabban Gamliel, whom the Halakha is in accordance with, that Mishna is written shorthand (חיסורא מחסרא) and should more fully be read: אין בין ארבעה עשר שבאדר הראשון לי"ד שבאדר השני אלא מקרא מגילה ומתנות There is no difference between the 14th of Adar Alef and the 14th of Adar Bet, except ...


7

To help maintain PTIJ quality, perhaps the following should be implemented: A mod imposed limit of X (open undeleted) question-posts per person per season. (X=5?) Any question with a net negative score after Y hours is to be deleted by mods. (Y=12?) This would encourage users to post their best material only and remove anything making people unhappy. The ...


7

I agree with you in theory that something can legitimately be Purim Torah yet the joke might fail. In cases where a joke is simply not funny, indeed the question should not be closed. Those who don't appreciate the joke can downvote if they so desire, and move on. However, in practice, I think that many of the posts actually do fail the criteria for Purim ...


7

The policy states: So, post sincere-looking questions (you know, the kind that invite answers) that: ... misinterpret a real Torah concept or Jewish text ... I can't speak for anyone else, but for me, the issue here is not whether Judaism ideas (i.e. "Torah concepts") are fair game for PTIJ fun, but whether "gefilte" is an expression of Judaism (and not ...


6

I like the criteria in the question. To reiterate: To be valid Purim Torah on Mi Yodeya, a question must have at least one of the following three components: A mis-application of a Torah principle A mis-interpretation of a Jewish text, be it Tanach, Talmud, or some later writing A "distinctly Torah style (e.g. Gemara/Rashi/Tosafot-formatted) ...


6

Personally, I just have a few tags which I block. One of them is the [purim-torah-in-jest] tag. So unless the question makes it onto HNQ, I won't even see that there is such a thing as Purim Torah (unless I specifically look for it). To block a tag, see https://judaism.stackexchange.com/users/preferences


6

On the other hand, Purim Torah brings readers to Mi Yodeya who wouldn't otherwise visit, potentially exposing them to valuable (seriously, from the point of view of MY's general mission of spreading knowledge about Judaism) content. Every Purim Torah page has links to the front page, to seasonal tags highlighted in Community Events, and to serious questions ...


5

Our Purim Torah policy says: If you want an old Purim Torah question re-opened during this year's season, ask the moderators. Alternatively, you can use the reopen queue, as for any other closed question. Which is what happened in this case -- an ordinary user nominated the question for reopening, which sent it to the review queue where you saw it....


5

I like this limitation. I think a reasonable cap would be one question per day per user, without roll-over questions. This would both cause users to weigh their PTIJ posts for selection of their best material, and create some built-in spreading of PTIJ posts over the season, so that they aren't all flooded in at once. PTIJ season lasts about 16 days, so ...


5

Proposal: people who observe Shushan Purim get the extra day to ask questions. The rest of us should have moved on to cleaning for Pesach. (While questions remain open anybody can answer.) As a practical matter, though, I believe there's been some variation in the exact dates from year to year, in part to accommodate Shabbat, and it would be very un-PTIJ-...


5

My additions in bold. Please edit as you feel appropriate. Generally, we expect all questions here to be written from the point-of-view of genuine curiosity, and we expect all answers to be genuine attempts to provide real information and analysis that directly addresses the question. However, the community has indicated that, if regulated carefully, Purim ...


5

When somebody searches or uses tags to find questions about kashrut or a particular parsha or a minhag etc, I don't think the results should include Purim Torah questions. The typical visitor from Google won't know what "PTIJ" means and shouldn't have to read through a question only to find out it's not serious. Further, the misunderstandings upon which ...


5

I am on Meta now! You are talking about my question. It is a question. I want to know what you want from me. It is Judaism. It is about a Judaism thing where you people call my name again and again. It is for Purim. It is really about a song not about people calling my name. I am not stupid. I know this is From When and not really my name. I am pretending to ...


4

I disagree with this suggestion for two reasons. To me, the sentence sounds better with "completely." I'm not sure exactly why, but to me it does. The best Purim Torah answers come when the question is taken somewhat seriously. We don't want trivial answers. Of course the question is asked tongue-in-cheek, but answers will be much better if the answerers do ...


4

I think that Purim Torah questions and answers, when in season and otherwise following the rules, should be considered on-topic if they are clearly recognizable as Judaism-related, which would include: Dealing with Judaism content (our standard on-topic requirement) Dealing with a parodic version of Jewish content Applying Jewish sources (or parodies ...


4

There was some discussion of this (which I can't find now :-( ) when we got the custom close reasons. On the one hand we need to be able to close the purim-torah questions with an appropriate reason each year. On the other hand, we don't really want extra close reasons cluttering up the dialogue the rest of the time (it should be as easy as possible for ...


4

Though I still think that the implementation of a limit on PTIJ questions is unnecessary per my other answer to this question it seems that my position is not the majority based on how voting has gone so far on this question. The currently top-voted answer proposes a minimum waiting time between posts. If we do go this route, I'd like to propose suspending ...


4

While this makes some sense, I do not support it as the costs of implementing it far outweigh the benefits thereof IMHO. It's easier to explain to people that we have one time period with certain rules than to go about policing only questions for two days to a bunch of surprised and confused users. If someone wants to post a question that late in the season,...


4

First, I’d like to distinguish between the five questions. PTIJ: What do you people want? was asked in a very Purimdik tone; the problem here is on the Q&A side, not the Purim side. I don’t see an easy way to preserve both. Then there’s the other four: PTIJ: I am very humble and I want you to know it PTIJ: What is the proper attire for women in ...


3

That's an interesting corner case. Questions with bounties can't be closed and a bounty must run for at least 24 hours before being awarded. For this year I propose: still-active bounties must be awarded as soon after the end of PTIJ season as the interface allows (you won't get your full week), and if that means moderators have to delay closing that ...


3

"Too localized" is no longer a standard closure reason, but, yes, I agree such questions should be closed, say as "unclear what you're asking". We've closed some already.


3

Yes. This can be accomplished in one of two ways: Delete the question. This is probably obvious. Put a historical lock on the question. This is a special status that moderators can place on a given question, which will preserve it and all of its answers on the site but prevent any future modifications. It will also remove it from all default lists - you'll ...


3

(I don't think the post you link to in the question is a good example of what you're asking about, inasmuch as its author says, in a comment there, that it's meant as a joke. In any event:) No, a serious answer to a Purim Torah question is not addressing the question as asked (viz with the PTIJ disclaimer) or as intended. Thus, it's not an answer.


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