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15

The community has generally accepted the following jargon guidelines.1 They're not hard-and-fast rules, but should be considered by users when posting and when editing others' posts. When writing questions and answers on Mi Yodeya, the overall guiding principle you should have in mind is: Will any English speaker who is interested in this content be able ...


13

It does not! An early version of this site had the following important disclaimer at the top, in red: Like Wikipedia, mi.yodeya makes no guarantee of validity, and does not offer professional (particularly rabbinic) advice. Treat mi.yodeya information like it came from a crowd of your friends. And we mean it! On a website like this you can get some ...


13

The close banner you mentioned: This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question. is shown to the public readers except the asker. This is presumably because they can't (and generally shouldn't) edit the question to clarify the difference. The asker actually ...


10

It sounds like you've been a victim of serial downvoting. There is a script that runs (I think nightly) to detect and reverse voting anomolies like this, so my guess is that you'll get your votes back tomorrow. It seems unlikely that eleven different people simultaneously developed aversions to one of your answers.


10

The community has generally accepted this as the canonical list of in- and out-of-scope topics on Mi Yodeya. If you have a question about... Jewish law or practice (what to do or why) How many slices are required to make you responsible to wash on Pizza? Why is it OK to have a sermon right before Kaddish of Musaf? Can you recommend an alternative outer ...


10

The pattern I have noticed consists of 5 sources of information: Closed or open library sources. e.g. Sefaria, HebrewBooks.org, Otzer. Google searches in Hebrew will often turn up articles. Recollection of a discussion from Yeshiva, a Shiur, etc. An obscure (or not so obscure) reference that someone actually read and remembered. An article from something ...


9

Accepting your own answer is an intentional feature in the StackExchange network. By accepting an answer you make it clear that the question has been resolved, and easy to see the accepted which is marked with a green check-mark. Usually accepting an answer gives 15 reputation points to the answerer, and permanently docks the answer directly under the ...


9

Ok; 6 of these couldn't be done automatically as they contained search parameters that broke with a simple search-and-replace. I edited those manually to fix the links. The remaining posts were re-written en mass to fix the links, and won't be bumped to the homepage. https://judaism.stackexchange.com/search?q=url%3Achabadlibrary.org%2Fbooks%2Fdefault.aspx


8

The FAQ entry says: If a user comments on their own post and there is only one person who has previously commented, then that person is also notified if @name is forgotten.


8

You do. When you offer a bounty, the amount of rep is immediately deducted from your current reputation, so what you see now in l's profile is what is left after he offered the bounty. Background: "l'" is the user formerly known as Vram. He decided to leave the site, and tried to remove his impact as much as possible. He deleted many of his answers (perhaps ...


8

What you're seeing may be an instance of an answer that was converted by a mod into a comment. The post was bumped when the user posted the answer, but all you see now is the comment, as the answer in its original form was deleted and is invisible to users with less than 10K rep.


8

The Deputy and Marshal badges are only granted to registered users - not moderators. The count of helpful flags shown on the election nomination screen is in fact correct - msh210 does have a lot of helpful flags (specifically on comments). Isaac does in fact show a few helpful flags however, this isn't the entire story as far as who is more helpful in ...


8

So that you'll think twice before doing it.


8

There are no private messages between users on the SE network. If a user has recently been present on chat, you can ping them there. If you have enough rep you can start your own chat rooms, and even limit who can speak in them. If you want to speak to a moderator privately, they can set up private chat rooms which only you and them can enter. You can ask ...


8

Very simply, no, there is no problem at all with "lurking." You're welcome to read whatever interests you on Mi Yodeya, and there's no obligation to participate. If and when you want to post a question, you're certainly welcome to do that, too. You may find it helpful to read our official FAQ and community-written FAQ posts here on Meta, but if you've read ...


7

I have brought this issue up to SE staff, and the response was that if you think a post here on meta hasn't gotten the attention it deserves from SE staff, tell us mods. If we agree, we'll bother them about it.


7

The reputation levels for privileges here on Judaism aren't currently at the same levels as other public beta sites, due to an oversight during the migration from the original mi.yodeya site. As the site approaches its graduation, these levels will be reevaluated and adjusted, placing them on par with other graduated sites, so look for them to actually ...


7

The elected moderators will replace the current moderators. Moderators for beta sites are all appointed and not selected by the community. These are positions to be held until the community has grown enough to elect their own moderators (i.e., graduation). As every beta graduates, new, permanent moderators are elected.


7

Yes. On your profile, first go to the "activities" tab and then choose the "comments" sub-tab. This will show you a date-ordered list of comments you've posted that have not been deleted. (Like deleted posts, deleted comments don't show up on your profile.) If you've never looked around in "activities" (used to be called "activity") before, check it out -...


7

That's default text that is visible if you haven't set any "about me" — but only to you and only on the page that allows you set that field. If you start typing in that box, that text should disappear. If it doesn't, please report a bug.


7

According to a a Stack Exchange employee, there is no way for non-moderators to view deleted comments, nor will Stack Exchange implement such a feature. Sorry. As a piece of device from Shog's answer: For most intents and purposes, deleted comments are gone - you should try your best to put anything of value into an actual answer. As you note, you ...


7

Moderators cannot see who downvoted a post. Note not all downvotes need to come with explanations, though they are often nice and hopefully constructive. There are automatic systems in place to remove votes which seem fraudulent or inappropriate.


7

The comments that I can see on the two linked posts appear to be (properly) addressing the content rather than its author, critiquing or requesting improvements to the content. This seems to me to be an appropriate use of comments. The posts the comments apply to are long and complicated, so it seems reasonable that a user could find many points worthy of ...


7

The Stack Exchange logo on the top-right of each page has the same links to Meta and chat and other SE sites that used to be available from the SE logo on the top-left. (The top-left one, as you've probably noticed, now links to the SE homepage.)


7

In your user profile, under the activity tab, under the all actions tab, you'll find a tab listing all your comments.


7

It's because you answered it, yes. You can always see your own deleted posts if you have a link. Because it doesn't make sense to see an answer in isolation, if your deleted post is an answer, you see the question too. (And any other answers, I suppose; I don't think there's code to show subsets of pages like that.) You can see your own recent deleted ...


7

Google! 😀 ... and Sefaria, Mercava, and Google Search in Hebrew are all superb resources.


7

This is an excellent idea; in fact I did it myself. My first post on this site was exactly two years ago (12/21/17), but if you look at my profile you will see that it says: Member for 3 years, 2 months I was thus a member for over a year before ever posting. While I didn't intentionally do this for the reasons you describe, I believe it did help me ...


6

לכתחילה — lechatechila, l'hat'hila — from the outset (a priori) contrasted with בדיעבד — bediavad, b'dieved — after some action was taken (a posteriori) Example usage: You may not cook it l'chat'chila but b'diavad, if you cooked it, you may eat it.


6

I've added the following to the top of the question: Moderator's note: As with all discussions of Jewish law on this site, any information included in this question or its answers is presented only for the purpose of understanding the relevant ideas, not as practical rabbinic advice. Especially with respect to marriage and divorce, consult your Rabbi ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible